Spotlight on toes

January 17, 2017


    Summer ready?  This is what we should be asking our clientele about now.  In New Zealand we have had somewhat of a late start to pedi season what with the lack of sun and much torrential rain.  So it's time to make up for all that and encourage some delayed pampering.  A lot of questions have been asked of late regarding diabetes, and other foot related disease, so I have noted down some points to consider.  NEVER take your job for granted. We have a responsibility to provide safe services in a clean environment with a qualified technician.  If this is you, yell it from the roof tops, promote the fact and take pride in what you do.      Never stop learning, ever.  Think you know it all?  Then it's time to try something new, get out of your comfort zone, because the nail industry is fast moving and forever changing, so you can never be completely at the top of your game.  Be thankful and stay hungry for knowledge and you'll always enjoy your job. 


PEDI SPA SANITATION PROCESS- the basics


* Drain all water from spa unit. * Scrub all visible debris from surface with a stiff bristled brush, using soap or disinfectant.           * Brush must be cleaned and disinfected between use. * Rinse basin clean with water. * Fill basin with clean water and circulate the correct amount of bleach or disinfectant through for at least ten minutes.      * Drain, rinse and wipe dry with paper towels. * At the end of each day, remove screens (removable parts) and clean out with a small brush and surfactant (detergent).  Replace cleansed parts. * Fill basin with warm water and disinfectant, turn on jets and leave to circulate for at least ten minutes. * Drain and rinse, dry with paper towels.
* If possible, leave the basin full of disinfectant solution overnight once a week, being sure to empty, rinse, refill with clean water and repeat process.    Use meticulous care when sanitising pedicure implements, and always follow correct procedure.  Towels should be washed in accordance with health and safety guidelines, hot wash temperatures and use of a bleach additive.  Floors, handles, trolleys, shelving- all surface areas all should be sanitised regularly; to make it easier, keep a record of cleaning duties or a stringent routine in place that all staff  are aware of and tick off as cleaning duties are performed.  Keeping up universal sanitation is especially important in the pedicure area, warm damp places are just begging micro- organisms over to party.  Give your clientele peace of mind by offering pedicure services in a safe and assuring atmosphere.   

This is a guideline only.  For a full list of proper practices join us- Professional Nail Technicians Association.

 

 

DIABETES- health and safety spotlight

 

Communication and consultations are always important in any salon, and potential diabetic clientele is one of the reasons this is so crucial.  This condition may effect many areas of a manicure/ pedicure process.  A mistake made by an operator could lead to infection and at the very worst, amputation.  A diabetic has a decreased production of insulin, which is produced by the pancreas, or they have developed a resistance to their own insulin.  Insulin is a natural substance we all have in our body that allows sugars (glucose) found in the bloodstream to be absorbed
properly.  Approximately one in twenty people have some type of diabetic condition so we as professionals must be prepared and educated in how to deal with the condition.    Diabetics often have a loss of feeling in legs and feet; neuropathy.  In this case a client can't tell if they have been scolded, cut or grazed.  Ulcers, infections and foot sores may also be present.  These infections are particularly dangerous to a diabetic and must be seen by a general practitioner.  Pedicure services should not be performed in these cases.  If a cuticle nipper were to nip an area of cuticle or skin, it may result in such an infection.  When checking feet, look for blisters, infected ingrown toenails, cuts, dry heels that are cracked that look infected or vulnerable to infection.      Contact the diabetes association for further information, www.diabetes.org.nz or your local diabetes centre,  and only take information from reliable sources.  Nail chat groups are great, but you shouldn't take advice with out professional backup, it's up to you to be responsible in the way you receive and give advice.  Train all staff in every aspect of analysis and consultation, omitting  this step can have dire consequences.    As a professional, it's important to understand the complications that can occur through this disease.  It's also important to understand there is nothing stopping a person who has diabetes from enjoying a luxurious spa pedicure experience.  Empower yourself with the confidence that education and awareness brings- your clients will feel safe and relaxed in your hands.     

 

    

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